5 Reasons Why This Saturday’s Artist Post Is Driving Me Crazy!

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Marisa D. Aceves. Indomitable Arrow City At Dusk. digital art/photography. 2016.

I really wanted to give you a great post this Saturday, but as luck, fate or an overloaded system would have it, this is what it has come to!

*side note to you, the reader and myself (After this post is published, I will immediately throw my myself on the couch with fists flying, legs kicking and my loudest scream possible….you would too…if it happened to you….over and over…and over…

 

1. Whenever I try to attach my picture to the post all I get is a giant photo and some crazy code describing the height and width of the photo beneath it!

That’s right folks including the artwork to this post has been a &^%$!!! and the afternoon is just getting started….

 

2. My allergies are killing me!!!!! Honestly!!!!!

I didn’t get much sleep for this entire week! This is making me crazy mad. So therefore all my patience”flew out the window” on Wednesday.

 

3. My stupid tablet is acting up again!

If you’re a frequent tablet user, eventually what I so fondly call tablet hiccup or stiction will happen to you and if you have an especially nice tablet….then that will make you doubly insane….Don’t tell me to reboot or restart my tablet…I’ve done that…

 

4. I’m in a generally pissy mood!!!!

Yup, that’s what lack of sleep and frequent computer troubles will get you, especially if you are a sensitive flower…I mean like a cactus flower….yeah..reeeeeaaaal sensitive!!

 

5. I’ve been so busy with inbound marketing for my business and other health issues I wasn’t able to spend as much time as I would have liked this week working on my art!!!

This happens to the best of us! Not that I’m the best of you… For the moment I’m simply engaging in a little wishful thinking! However, when you can’t do the things you love as much…well…that’s kinda like telling a small child that they can’t play outside cause ‘ the other kids will catch the flu!!!!
*If you’re a wee bit sympatico and you’re not too busy…Hint…that..always helps…Drop on by my website acevesart.com and checkout my new geometric digital art landscape and cityscape paintings made with photography!
*Sincerely, despite all this weeks CHALLENGES ..I mean garbage…I have enjoyed sharing and learning with you. Have a wonderful weekend! Do somethig fun! Spend time with family and loved ones! Lift someone out of their self-imposed, world imposed misery! Practice compassion! Practice love! Never forget to explore the possibilites!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New Fusion Series Coming Soon!

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Marisa D. Aceves. Fusion: Steely Probiotica. digital photography. 2016.

To check out more of my work and samples of my new series, please visit acevesart.com .

Round, blistered bodies emerge from the shadows.  Steel panes bend to meet the light as passersby gaze upon this strange, urban enigma.  Lovers of living modern myths enjoy it’s company, while staunch traditionalists bemoan the idiocy of federal funding.

I am excited to announce that I have some new series in the works that I plan to release so stay tuned. If you’ve been a frequent visitor to this page, then I would like to personally thank you for your interest and support.

Some of my new work utilizes sections of my past photography to create design based pieces that are a nod to the recent trend of recycling. You might say, that I’m re-imagining everyday objects that I’ve already re-imagined (taken out of their normal context to give them a different significance and meaning).

I knew from the moment I saw this object, that I had to photograph it, but I was not sure how I was going to do it. Then, I decided that the most interesting part of the object was it’s unusual texture. In order to highlight this, I chose to use dramatic lighting.

What does this object remind you of?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary Objects That Look Like Geometric Landscapes

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Marisa D. Aceves. Octogonal Color Field. digital photography. 2016

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

Silvery wells gather the fragments of an unfolding chapter. Harsh lights scatter midnight shadows on the shoes of passing girls and middle aged women. Geometry enjoys a cocktail at the homes of wannabe socialites.

I’d love to add a big, mysterious, wonderfully poignant, life-changing story to this post, but it was, in reality, just another trip to the store.

What does this object remind you of?

Ordinary Objects That Combine Industry and Nature

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Marisa D. Aceves. Rise And Fall Wave Grid: Ocean Blues. digital photo 2015

To check out more of my work please visit acevesart.com.

Some believe beauty now rests on the progressive mantles of contemporary design. Nature touches cold metal. She gently moves  toward his heart with alluring eyes and unpredictability. He catches her and they dance for awhile. When she leaves marks on his face he is told it is a crime of passion. He orders her, then retreats; content to dwell in numbers, shapes and the passage of time.

The edge of this object intrigued me as it reminded me of both Industry and Nature. In the accompanying poem, we experience Industries initial view of Nature not Nature’s true state of being which has both masculine and feminine aspects. Industry didn’t realize the gift that nature bestowed nor did it realize natures time or hours. Nature, initially in Industry’s eyes was assumed to be unpredictable and after their affair retreated yet again to what was familiar. Nature, assuming industry had no feeling or heart  attempted to give it one. I saw this object also as a comment on relationships and how the proper balance of give and take is essential to their success. The titles of he and she featured in the poem above are not meant to represent actual human beings, but rather certain aspects of masculine and feminine energies. Some females have a more masculine energy, while some males have a more feminine energy. While I have to admit that there are some aspects of nature that are harsh and could even be viewed as aggressive, many over the years have viewed Nature as a mother and so I (as a female) have chosen to describe Nature as such.  If you have any questions about this poem please feel free to comment as I am not purposefully trying to promote sexism of any kind. *NOTE: This literature is intended as a comment on our preconceived notions of one another, it is not meant as an actual representation. I was drawn to the idea of writing a poem with a 1940’s film noir aesthetic. It reminds me that we spend so much time focusing on what we think we are getting, that we often overlook what we receive. Stereotypes and timeworn notions of what we are capable of achieving or giving cloud our thinking, judgement and appreciation of each others contributions. What does this object remind you of?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ORDINARY OBJECTS THAT LOOK LIKE THE BENDING OF SPACE AND TIME

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Marisa D. Aceves. Inter-spatial Plume. digital photography. 2015.

To view more of my work please visit acevesart.com

Fiery tongues bend toward the light. Vanity chases the outer limits of possibility, yet never succeeds in contemplating the mysteries of eternity. Dwelling in quiet pools of desperation, she can only gaze at countless reflections of herself.

Sorry folks, I’ve been quite ill this weekend so this is a real stretch for me, but I’ve succeeded in pushing my puny self to the computer to get this little ole’ post to you.  This is a new addition to the Reflections/Refractions Gallery on my website. Once more I found the source of my inspiration at a store our family likes to visit.  I felt this particular object reminded me of the bending of space and time or perhaps the inside of a wormhole. What does this object remind you of?

Have a wonderful weekend and don’t forget to live life creatively!

UPCOMING ZERO COMPOSITION SERIES

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Marisa D. Aceves. Zero Composition 1. 2015.

To view more of my work please checkout my website acevesart.com

Six sharp circles sink into the slick, reflective surface. Brown blinds bend to meet the receptive mirror. They dance for awhile, content to contemplate the infinite possibilities.  Each new position is an opportunity for change, a chance to find meaning in a world of confusion.

It took some time for me to decide whether or not I was going to photograph these objects. During the shoot I had to constantly clean them. Dust, wax and grease had collected on them. This was threatening to kill the illusion that I knew could be achieved if I could satisfactorily clean off all that gunk.  After several photos and much annoyance, I settled upon this photo as it reminded me of many abstract geometric paintings I had studied in school. What does this object remind you of?

Marisa D. Aceves. Zero Compositon 1. 2015.

Why You Don’t Have To Be Ernest Hemingway To Write About Your Art

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Marisa D. Aceves. Pigment Cascade 1. digital photography

article by Marisa D. Aceves

We all love creating our artwork.

When we get a new idea that we just can’t wait to flesh out, we race to our studios with sparkling eyes and child-like enthusiasm, but while we’re content to lose ourselves in the creative process, we may or may not always feel the same when assigned the task of writing about our art.

Why is writing about what we love to do so intimidating?

Could it be that many of us share a common tendency to compare the quality of our thoughts and words to those of   popular art magazines or perhaps the works of award winning authors we were forced to read in school (ex. Hemingway and Malamud)that leave us tossing our laptops and tablets in disgust at out perceived  lack of literary genius?

Of course we could always make the excuse that we were too busy in our studios to write about our work…

…and maybe that might be partially true…but…

…no matter how much we procrastinate, ultimately we will have to provide some explanation for why we create, even if the real reason is as uncomplicated as “I felt like it!”.

If you are one of a number of artists who subtly fears the writing process, don’t fret over words.

Make them work for you.

Here are some suggestions for cutting through the confusion and getting to the meat of your artistic message.

1) Give A Little History –  Inquiring people are anxious to know how, when and why you became an artist.

Some artists’ route to creativity is traditional while others “fall into” their art practice by first participating in some other activity.

Include this distinction in the course of writing about your work.

If you are an artist which has a background in other fields of expertise and you apply this experience to your art, explain how this adds to your unique approach and perspective.

Artists who have undertaken a more traditional, well-traveled route to their artistic development may want to share what subjects, events etc. that inspired them or that continue to inspire their creations.

2) Write About Your Work Often – Practice removes the “intimidation factor” from your writing.

Sure, it’s a little scary, but then again, if you are still learning, you’re always new at something.

Set aside time in the day or week to write down your thoughts and feelings about your work.

Create a schedule that you know is easy to keep.

3) Write in Small Increments – Sitting yourself down to write for an hour or two can lead to procrastination as you sit there tapping pencil to paper waiting for the words to flow.

 If you know that you freeze when forced with a long, drawn out job, you may want to spread the work out and do things in between writing.

This eases you anxiety and helps you to collect you thoughts.

4) Observe the Writing of Others – 

I think the best way to learn how to write about art is to familiarize yourself with the way fellow professional artists write about their work and the work of others.

When observing articles artist write about other artists, consider these questions:

 a) Do they include background information about the artist before describing what they do?

 b) Do they include where the artist lives and works, their specialty (photography, painting, sculpture, installation etc.?

 c) Do they mention the artists level of education, awards and experience?

 d) Do they mention what is unique about the artists’ work?

Once you learn to break down art articles into bits of information, the easier and less intimidating it will be to write about your own.

Here are some things to keep in mind when you study the artist statements of others:

1) What is their work about?

2) What is their particular discipline (photography, painting, sculpture, installation etc.)?

3) Why do they create their work?

4) What are they trying to say with their work?

As you read their statements make sure to answer the questions mentioned above.

When you are finished you will have a rough map of the type of information that you will need to include in your own statement.

You can learn to write about your own art, or defer to others who may or may not truly understand your vision.

Be pro-active; don’t let the meaning of your art get lost in translation.

I am hopeful that over time, you will continue to grow and improve your communication with your audience.