Ordinary Objects That Look Like Water 3

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Marisa D. Aceves. Discovering Spring Cleaning: Double Eye Water Wave Meditation. digital photography. 2016.

For more examples of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

 Moving gracefully toward earth

 Shapes form rhythmic waves

 A resplendent home at the waters edge

 

It’s always a challenge hunting for new and exciting surfaces to photograph. You can’t take every surface home to properly light it. Sometimes it’s in front of you for only a brief moment before it disappears from view. If you hesitate, you lose the shot. If you don’t snap up an item on sale, someone else will buy it. Then you might never get the chance to bring it into your studio or workspace. In life as in art, timing is often a large part of success. When I spotted this item at one of our local stores, I had only a few minutes to take the picture before employees and customers started to wonder what the heck I was doing. I also had to contend with the stores harsh lighting which briefly stole my confidence before I summed up the courage to shoot despite the obstacles.

This photograph is a sample from my New Spring Cleaning Series that deals with removing from our lives harmful thoughts, habits or individuals that are detrimental to our emotional, psychological and spiritual health. The repetitive rhythms and colors are meant to generate a sense of calm and awareness. I used cleaning supplies to create the first part of this series which provides a pun on it’s title.

Ordinary Objects That Look Like Steamy Landscapes

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Marisa D. Aceves. Heatscape 1. digital photography 2016.

To check out more of my work, please visit acevesart.com.

A virulent muse spreads her flesh and desire throughout the factory. As the room spins, steam bubbles, burdened by the summer heat, hitch a ride on the backs of their spiritless, affluent neighbors. Sealed neatly inside this commercial package, society groans while the youth quake.

 

Hope you all have a wonderful weekend!

ORDINARY OBJECTS THAT LOOK LIKE SUN AND SEA

Sonic Wavescape watermark pic

Marisa D. Aceves. Heaven And Earth Sonic Wavescape. digital photo.

To view more of my work, please checkout http://www.acevesart.com/

Gentle waves ripple across the surface.  A sudden burst of sun yellow radiates a familiar visual heat then gradually succumbs to a deep sea cobalt blue. The scene is hot and cold, fire and ice, heaven and earth.

When I first noticed this peculiar item at a home enhancement store, I was immediately drawn to its unusual surface.  Though the initial piece was subtle in color, it had a unique sculptural quality. It’s general pattern reminded me of heat waves, sun rays and moving water. Later, I found that a certain amount of color enhancement was necessary to illustrate the combining of these two natural elements, fire and water.

EVERYDAY OBJECTS THAT HAVE THE LOOK OF MOVING WATER 2

Marisa D. Aceves. Pineapple Composition: Fire. digital photography. 2015

To check out more of my work please visit acevesart.com

The turbulent, translucent surface boils vigorously. Odd shaped bubbles form into glass eyes rushing to gather the color beneath them. The scene is set for all of creation to sample this primordial color soup.

The object above holds particular significance because it was a gift from my sister Kathy.  After noticing the shape and texture of the object, she thought I could use it for my photography.  I took her advice and photographed two different versions.  One of the versions has cool, icy undertones; the other (the one featured above) has a warm fiery color scheme.  Different objects that surround us remind us of the elements, nature and the things for which we are familiar. Many people wait their whole lives for “big things” to happen so that they can appreciate them. When the “big things” are few and far between they get gloomy, and depressed. However, I believe that if we learn to see the beauty and fascination in the little things, not only do we develop an “attitude of gratitude”, but we learn to exist “positively”in the present moment. Part of gratefulness is not simply pretending that you are thankful, anyone can do that while still secretly deciding to be miserable. It is seeing the possibilities in the objects, people, plants, animals and situations that you encounter that lifts you out of the complacency and helplessness of these uncertain times.

Have a restful weekend and a great new week!

CHROMA BLAST ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY Series: Household Collectibles That Have The Look and Feel of Water

CHROMA BLAST- WELL DROP

Marisa D. Aceves CHROMA BLAST: Well drop. digital photography

Check out more of my digital photography at acevesart.com

Another anxious droplet breaks the silent surface. Brilliant fuchsia, violet and tangerine erupt from its center as it radiates waves of energy. A small, imitation sun is born boldly and dies gracefully as the ripples settle.

My cousin, Stacey gave me these beautiful glass collectibles for Christmas.  I like them so much that I enjoy their beauty year round.  I placed the wire angel display for the ornaments in our office.  Occasionally, I will look away from the computer screen. My tired eyes will fall upon the angel and I will remember Stacey’s thoughtful gesture. So in honor of my cousin (After all, it’s her birthday today, so wish her a happy one!), I decided to post this on a Saturday, instead of my usual Sunday post! I sincerely hope that you all have a wonderful and restful weekend.

Kitchenware That Looks Like Sleek Monochromatic Abstract Design

Blue Equilibrium copy

Marisa D. Aceves. Blue Equilibrium. digital photography

To check out more of my photographs and paintings please visit acevesart.com

Small water droplets form upon the tinted, transparent surface. A rich blue-violet hue slowly fades in concentration as it travels upwards toward a semi-circular cloud of condensation. Two bold, brown and white figures sit in the upper middle of the composition, a curious clue to what lies behind the veil…

We had just finished our dinner. The object I photographed for this post sat right in front of me.  It had faithfully occupied the same space each evening of the week and yet I hadn’t considered capturing the qualities that made it unique and artistically valuable.  I like to imagine that it was patiently waiting there in plain sight for the time when I would see it from the right angle. Then resistance to it’s apparent charms would be futile.  There are 2 versions of this photograph.  In the version featured above, the color is more concentrated.  The other version, shown here, Blue Equilibrium-Dark copyis darker and the overall effect is more dramatic.  Which version do you prefer? I guess it all depends on your mood.

Stop Fighting Your Art and Your Art Won’t Fight You! :) Wrestling With Your Art – Advice on Inspiration and Art Making Frustration

 Stop Fighting Your Art and Your Art Won't Fight You! :) Wrestling With Your Art - Advice on Inspiration and Art Making Frustration

When we are searching for that one object to photograph, that one object that will give us a small slice of momentary joy upon it’s discovery, we often forget about the places most overlooked in our home, at the local store, or perhaps in our neighborhood. So it was when I stumbled upon this small object. I had photographed it several times before, but I never really felt that I truly captured it’s hidden beauty. Then, upon the upteenth examination, a watery aerial scene with small land masses emerged. Parts of the teal surface of the object shimmered, bubbled and folded like the ocean; it was at that moment that I knew I had to take a shot.
Inspiration, although welcomed with open arms, does not always come easily. I remember earlier in the week having a conversation with my mother about being frustrated with my paintings and how the constant problem solving and correcting of the images I was working on caused me so much stress that I almost didn’t want to paint. She gave me some very good advice. She told me that constant stressing about your work and project deadlines is a creativity killer. Before I had significantly reached the point of extreme exasperation, I should just put the work aside and start on something else I had planned to do earlier in the week that is either related to my art (composing a new post, working on another project, market research etc.), or non-related (mundane household chores, etc). In this way, I could come back to what I had previously been working on refreshed and mentally ready to approach and solve the problems that I had in my work. Wise woman. Sometimes, mothers really do know what is best! On a similar note, it is when we “sweat the small stuff” hem, haw and worry about what other’s think, that we lose the childlike joy we once had when we approached our art making. Art shouldn’t become a chore; it is one of many ways that we use to express ourselves and share our experiences and point of view with others. When art is a chore it becomes painful. However, this difficult experience has a beautiful lesson for us, because it helps us to reevaluate why we create art. What are your reasons for creating art? What inspires you? What causes you frustration and hampers creativity? What are some ways you might plan to resolve this issue? Please feel free to share thoughts, ideas and experiences! I’d love to hear from you.

Check out more of my work at http://www.acevesart.com