Ordinary Objects That Look Like Abstract Paintings 2

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Marisa D. Aceves. Rectangular Autumn Symphony 1. digital photography. 2017

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart. com.

 

Subtle colors passing through

Leaving light trails

Impressing my mind

With times and times long past

Distant memories

Fragments that bind

by Marisa D. Aceves

 

It was a cool autumn day when we decided to take a trip to our local Walmart. At first, we were searching for matching comforters for my bed, but when we were unsuccessful, we decided to look for light blocking curtains to keep the house warm and save energy. Unfortunately, we failed to find heavier curtains for the windows as well. We settled for a rather inventive solution to our original plan, a material commonly used outdoors.      After we got home, we spread the material on the floor, trimming it as needed. Light danced on it’s surface, breaking up reflected colors from around the room. I noticed creases on the material that formed a visually fascinating repetitive pattern. I gently hovered over it and took the shot. I subtly enhanced the color, shadow and highlights, adding a light filtered texture for interest. When the photograph was complete, I realized that I could create other works from this one photograph. A collection emerged. While I’m happy to report that we finally found my matching bedspread and sheets, I’m glad we took the small adventourous detour that birthed the Primary Reflection Series.

Have a wonderful weekend! Don’t forget to check out the new Primary Reflection Series on my website, coming in November!

 

Ordinary Objects That Look Like Colorful Jewels 2

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Marisa D. Aceves. Spectrum 3: Floating Diamond Prism. digital photography. 2017

To see more of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

Diamonds of beauty

Shapes delight

Floating on oceans color

Dividing the light

 

Floating Diamond Prism is the first abstract photograph created for mylatest series, Spectrum 3, which is inspired by  60s Optical Illusion Art and the light sculpture of Dan Flavin and James Turrell  . When I was searching for an object within my immediate surroundings to explore, I had no idea that the first shot would unveil the key to its secreat night life as a brilliantly colored light gem.

The journey began innocently enough. After a pleasant breakfast, I picked up my camera and combed my house for an everyday object that had unusual visual potential. After several rounds, I grew tired, but decided to push past my initial frustration. When I entered the bathroom to adjust the shower curtain, I made my discovery. A small ray of sunlight slid down the side of the curtain hitting the corner of the wall. I leaned in closely for the perfect picture. The first photograph had a rule of 2/3rds composition. The effect split the picture into two contrasting shades of grey.

I uploaded the picture and ran it through a photo editor. The grey was beautiful and subtle, but I felt that the picture needed some color to enhance the illusion that the light created. When I added color the work appeared to glow. After subtle manipulation and various odd methods of construction, I arrived at the perfect conclusion, a light/space color study that jumped off the page.

A year ago, I’d been looking at light/space and optical illusion works from the past. I admired the otherworldly, meditative place they created. It was not a place I could physically visit, but a room I could inhabit in my mind.  It was the creation of a new reality within the present one. I feel this series will achieve the same effect with photography, subtly transporting the viewer to a quite, peaceful corner of faith, hope and atmospheric beauty! I look forward to further exploration of the light/space theme as it adds a refreshing approach to my overall theme of object transformation.

What does this object remind you of?

New additions will be added to this series soon!

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Ordinary Objects That Look Like Abstract Landscapes

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Marisa D. Aceves. Surfacescape 1: Graduation. digital photography. 2016

To view more of my work please visit acevesart.com

A dark road met a ray of light

They held hands for a moment

against the glowing horizon

Shadows sought to guide the way

Where fear once lived

a greater curiosity stood

Meeting pale times

too young to live in memory

 

 

Ordinary Objects That Look Like Architecture 4

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Marisa D. Aceves. Optical Blind Wave 3. digital photography. 2017.

To check out more of my work, please visit acevesart.com.

Textured lines bend gracefully.

A line is lost; a line is found.

The ebb and flow of life culminates in the signature of a single fingertip.

Time imprints itself on men’s divided hearts.

 

What does this object remind you of?

ORDINARY OBJECTS THAT LOOK LIKE THE BENDING OF SPACE AND TIME

Interspacial Plume 1 copy

Marisa D. Aceves. Inter-spatial Plume. digital photography. 2015.

To view more of my work please visit acevesart.com

Fiery tongues bend toward the light. Vanity chases the outer limits of possibility, yet never succeeds in contemplating the mysteries of eternity. Dwelling in quiet pools of desperation, she can only gaze at countless reflections of herself.

Sorry folks, I’ve been quite ill this weekend so this is a real stretch for me, but I’ve succeeded in pushing my puny self to the computer to get this little ole’ post to you.  This is a new addition to the Reflections/Refractions Gallery on my website. Once more I found the source of my inspiration at a store our family likes to visit.  I felt this particular object reminded me of the bending of space and time or perhaps the inside of a wormhole. What does this object remind you of?

Have a wonderful weekend and don’t forget to live life creatively!

What Is Your Artistic Legacy?

Grandmother's House 1st Bedroom

 

Marisa D. Aceves. Grandmother’s House: 1st Bedroom. digital photography

Years from now…legacy

article by Marisa D. Aceves

For the last three months our minds, hearts, and lives have been tied up in preparing Eloisa’s house for sale.

Although things have slowed down considerably, I have still managed to find solace in faithfully recording some small treasures and a few rooms that remind me of my grandmother’s love.

We will make the long trip to her house again this coming week, but the journey will be a bittersweet one.

Potential buyers will traipse through the long corridor with its’ gold linoleum floors, gradually making their way through the living room, bedroom, kitchen and bath.

Eloisa was not her house; it was only a place she occupied for a certain period of time.

She has been gone for fourteen years, yet our memories of her remain.

It is not as though she sat up one day and announced that she was going to have a wonderful life and endear herself to many of the people that she came into contact with, but that is exactly what she did and all within the small, intimate confines of a typical Texas neighborhood.

The world may find the existence of an ordinary housewife boring even inconsequential.

“There’s not much of a story to tell”, they’d say under their breath preferring to read and write about flamboyant, drunken playwrights or headstrong, oversexed politicians.

There is a story to tell.

While the majority of the world may lack the imagination to see the overlooked beauty and profoundness of everyday occurrences, my grandmother knew that it is a series of small moments that make up our lives not just a couple of huge, game changing events.

If we can maintain a constant attitude of gratefulness for each and every second we are blessed to experience, we will never lose the child-like sense of wonder that leads to happiness.

She grew up sheltered from the persistent pessimism of her day.

Simple swatches of left-over wrapping paper were saved fastidiously, but not out of fear that she would not have enough of the everyday necessities we often take for granted.

“Someone else will need them!,” she would say as she carefully cut the small pieces of tape that sealed her latest birthday present, gently folding the paper into a neat rectangle for a neighbors future use.

Whenever someone was hungry, she always had beans, buttery tortillas and pinched star cookies ready to take home.

My grandmother lived her life for others; the majority of the things she did or said revolved around what was best for them.

She never judged you because you had problems; she would always pray for you and give you a big hug when you were ready to leave.

Eloisa’s legacy was a life of unconditional love and acceptance; it was a life steeped in spiritual simplicity.

Our legacy might be a different one than my grandmother’s, but all of us have an intense longing to be loved and remembered.

We want to know that somehow in this crazy, unpredictable world we made a difference.

What is your artistic legacy?

Is your work a way of life?

Does it illustrate your dreams, fears, and hopes?

What does it reveal about the way you view yourself and others?

Will you make a name for yourself and die lonely, or will you end this life with gratitude surrounded by friends and family?

Can you really have it all or do you believe you must sacrifice everything for your art?

These are questions only you can answer?

Perhaps your legacy will be based on a mantra you invent when you’re sixteen years old or maybe like Eloisa you will simply live an artful life that speaks for itself.