When Art Bites: Overcoming Your Inner Resistance to Change Part 2

When Art Bites: Overcoming Your Inner Resistance to Change Part 2

As we find ourselves in the midst of yet another holiday season, we all feel the pressure to conform to the gift giving insanity that surrounds us. We think, “If I can just give my sister, brother, significant other the perfect, expensive, trend gift of the moment, we will instantly receive the love, applause, and affection we often seek, but rarely come across on a daily basis. Quite frankly, the whole Christmas and New Years “Let’s buy the house and get ourselves into debt” type of social conditioning is not only incredibly exhausting, but the more we seem to focus on material things, the less grateful we are for the real wealth that is present in our hurried, busy lives. I’ve found that when I focused on the personal relationships that I’ve been blessed to have had during my lifetime (however brief or long) I could move past the exhausted, worried state and move towards one of peace, love, and gratitude. With that in mind, I have decided to post an abstract photograph (from my new satellite photo series) that I took with my phone of a piece of perfumed soap that my sister bought for me one Christmas. The object is not as important as the metaphor that this particular abstract landscape represents for me, the close and enduring friendship that I still continue to have with my sister. She has always been there for me through difficult times and through more productive ones, constantly encouraging me to pursue my art and reach out to others.
While reaching out to others this holiday season and letting them know that you care can sometimes seem like a scary proposition, (especially if you’re the shy introverted type) it is definitely rewarding on more levels than you can possibly imagine. I encourage you to take the leap and spread a little bit of your inner awesomeness around. You never know what seeds you will plant in a person’s life. A trendy gift lasts for a season, but a sincere smile and a warm hello can heal a heart that’s been slowly dying for years. It can ignite the spark that helps a person to realize their worth and the unique gifts that they can share with others.

Please feel free to share your stories or comments; I’d love to hear from you!

All Wrapped Up: A Season of Giving, A Season of Inspiration

All Wrapped Up: A Season of Giving, A Season of Inspiration

In my constant search for that one special object to photograph, I often run into an annoying phenomenon I affectionately like to call photographers block. When this happens, I usually turn my focus to writing or painting, but this time I felt that urge to use my camera again. I painted on and on as an increasing sense of urgency continued to plague me throughout the Thanksgiving week. Finally, my mother and I decided to take a break from our schedules to visit my aunt. During this visit, my aunt surprised my mother with a beautiful ruby red poinsettia plant wrapped in a floral foil of the same color. Although the graceful folds of the poinsettia leaves intrigued me, the foil fought for my attention and won. The photo above is the result. It reminds me that when we give a gift out of love, we inspire others to give. Sometimes the gifts give, especially when they teach us to see beauty in different and unique ways. They remind us that we are loved, they encourage us to love others, and they inspire us to create art.

Shades of Grey: The Perfect Simplicity of Black and White

Shades of Grey: The Perfect Simplicity of Black and White

Though color has captivated both photographer and viewer over the years, black and white photography still continues to fascinate us. Sometimes it sets a sombre mood, sometimes it alarms us with gritty, unflinching realism, sometimes it evokes a sense of nostalgia, but it always reaches us in a way that is mysterious, unexplainable and beautiful. In this particular series minimally titled “Composition”, I wanted to use black and white photography to emphasize both the shape and graceful form of the object. The tension that is observed between the mesh like material and the wide, black, linear straps adds to the overall visual interest of the piece.
For the love of all pictures black and white, I have attached a link to this short post for you to view and aspire to in your artistic journey, whether you are a photographer or collector http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/06/09/beautiful-black-and-white-photography/

Quick Creativity at Your Fingertips!

 Quick Creativity at Your Fingertips!

I wanted to take some time out to talk about camera phones. They are often under rated and can produce some interesting results. Although the use of a camera phone automatically makes taking pictures and sharing them more convenient, it is the compact size and easy accessibility that I most admire. Now, I dream about a Nokia Lumia 1020 as it is almost time to replace my old phone, but who knows which camera will inspire my desire next.
The photo above, entitled “Linear Rhythms: Abstract Still Life 2,” was taken with a phone.
I thought in this short post, I would like to include a list of some of the best camera phones available today for your future consideration.
Check it out folks!
http://reviews.cnet.com/best-camera-phones/
Feel free to share any great pictures that you might have taken with a phone!

Abstract Landscape: Desert 1247

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To mix things up, I decided to gather objects from around the house, particularly ones that I had used in previous pictures to create an entirely different abstract landscape. I decided to experiment with a different kind of camera. I used one of the settings from one of the modes on my small phone camera to achieve this look. People sometimes get the mistaken idea that if they don’t have a $500.00 + camera in hand, that they can’t take a decent picture, but that is simply not the truth. If you study the history of photography, you find that people have taken some of the most interesting pictures with small pin hole cameras that they assembled themselves. While I will agree that owning expensive equipment is never a bad thing and that many excellent photos are taken with professional quality cameras, it is nice to know that you can experiment with a variety of different cameras to create different effects. Never pass up an opportunity to create your art. The conditions are never perfect, so be creative and work with what you have.

Across the street -Suburban Landscape 2: A red car passing Sunday afternoon

Abstract photo of a Suburban Landspcape

I believe that the seeded glass often used in the windows of older homes provides an excellent backdrop for the passage of time. It obscures the details of the subject giving the scene a sense of mystery, while still providing the the rough patches of color and the general forms that make up the landscape. As you can gather from the title, this seeded glass picture, was taken at a different time than the previous one that I had posted. The texture of the seeded glass remains the same, but the color scheme is warmer, and the shapes that are visible through the glass have changed. It has been my experience, that the quite moments in life are silent treasures waiting to be discovered and appreciated. For more information on this photography series you may check out my main website at : http//www.acevesart.com/ .

Satellite Series: Winds 1

Satellite Series: Winds 1

If you have ever visited this blog before, you will note that I take everyday objects like tinfoil, plastic containers, plastic parfait glasses etc. and I try to take them from a different angle or in different lighting so that the viewer may experience them in a new and unexpected way. In some of my paintings (example: the Satellite Series which I have currently posted on my main website http://www.acevesart.com/), I use everyday objects to create a variety of textures. The everyday object is still an important part of the painting, but instead of functioning as the main subject matter or star of the show, it has more of a supporting role. The texture that the object leaves behind is used throughout the composition to create or add interest to the subject matter. I like to think that the mark or texture that each object leaves behind is evidence of the overall personality of the object; it is what makes each object unique, special. For instance, wash towels leave a decidedly mottled, grainy texture, while rubber jar grippers leave a playful, painterly, checkerboard weave. There are a number of objects that can be used; and these objects if used properly, give the work it’s character.