Promise of a New Year: What’s your Art Resolution for 2014?

Promise of a New Year: What's your Art Resolution for 2014?

Another year has come and gone and now it would appear it is time to make resolutions. I usually choose not to get in the habit of making resolutions because I never know what the year will bring. This does not mean that proper planning or taking advantage of the right opportunities is not helpful; it simply means that none of us can completely prepare for what we don’t know is going to happen. However, I have decided to break that mold and make an Art Resolution for 2014: I plan to find new and innovative ways to promote my work to a wider audience and investigate selling giclee prints online. Oops! I guess that would be more than one resolution! On that note, I would like to end this short and sweet post by inviting you to share your resolutions for this new year!

When Life Bites: Overcoming your inner Resistance to Change So That You Can See Life’s Possibilities Part 1

When Life Bites: Overcoming your inner Resistance to Change So That You Can See Life's Possibilities Part 1

No matter what your profession is in life, there will come a time when you have to learn a new set of skills or you are forced to participate, kicking, screaming, pulling your hair out and gnashing you teeth in an entirely new situation that you can neither avoid nor put off for next week. When we realize procrastination is not an option, we must learn to be both flexible and sensible about the tasks ahead. However, if we change our point of view and look at the skills, the knowledge and new relationships we can gain from these experiences, we can begin to view sometimes difficult situations in a more positive light. As an artist, I find that I am always having to adjust to different situations in the market place. I have sold art in a gallery setting, and to private collectors, but I am still learning how to create my own unique presence online. The marketplace for selling art has changed. With the advent of social media, artists like other business professionals must learn to sell their work on various different platforms. At first, I was excited about learning about the world of internet marketing, because I strongly believe that we can reach out to more people who need encouragement and share our unique point of view and passion. Then, as soon as the sky had opened up and poured opportunities for learning upon my weary head, various doubts and worries began to fill it and I was trying everything that I could to focus on how grateful I was to receive the help that I needed at the time that I needed it. I literally had to sit myself down and think about the many different reasons why I created art. Had art found me or had I found art? Nevertheless, I remembered that I created art because I wanted others to see the extraordinary in what they perceived was ordinary, unimpressive, everyday life. If we learn to do this, we will always have a grateful, feasting heart, because we will recognize the extraordinary in others as well as ourselves. When I created this particular piece in enamels, I was initially disappointed in the size of the piece, because I was completely sold on the idea that unless a work is grandiose in size, it has no impact, but that is just not true. Sometimes, smaller paintings, photographs etc. that you can easily carry or hold in your hand have a sense or feeling of intimacy that larger paintings cannot always deliver. I have also noticed this same principle at work when observing life. It is not always those that shout the loudest that make the biggest impact over time, but those that plant their genuine seeds of wisdom, love, perseverance, and compassion.

As always, feel free to share your individual thoughts and experiences with this subject! I’d love to hear from you!

The Duration of a Painting: A Slow Progression, A Fast Progression

The Duration of a Painting: A Slow Progression, A Fast Progression

Sometime in our artistic development, many of us are conned into believing that all painting styles and painting processes will inevitably lend themselves to quick completion. However, in my experience, this is not the case. In the past I have worked on paintings that I have completed within a short time span (like this particular painting in enamels entitled “Summit”), while others may take weeks or even months to finish. While the slow development of the series of paintings that I am currently working on has tried my patience on more than one occasion, I am determined to slowly plod my way through the series with the faith that eventually each piece will come to fruition. In order to come up with a solution that would somehow satisfy my growing sense of urgency while working in a slow, time consuming painting style, I decided to lay my paintings out assembly line. I am working on five paintings at once in order to both kill the monotony of a slow, painstaking process, and to keep the work consistent within the series. This is simply how I have chosen to attack this particular problem and still maintain interest in my work and its’ overall theme.
Please feel free to share your experiences with a similar situation! All comments are greatly appreciated, as I strongly feel that we can help to encourage one another in our artistic growth.