Ordinary Objects That Look Like Curious Sea Creatures: Jellyfish 1

Loofa ]ellyfish 1 copy 2 small

Marisa D. Aceves. Jellyfish 1. digital photography. acevesart.com 

Soft perforated waves of fabric twist and turn as they gracefully emerge from the silent darkness that envelops them. Although this peculiar breed of creature can’t be found  in any of the vast bodies of water that populate the planet, it reminds us of the structure of life we might experience if we visited the oceans depths. High-contrast monochromatic treatment of this simple, widely used subject helps to enhance the illusion that we are somehow included in this rare discovery.

Earlier this week, I was busy looking for objects to photograph. I stumbled upon this object hanging out in the my bathroom with the towels, soaps, body washes, and countless styling tools.  At first I didn’t want to disturb it, especially since it’s undramatic, vanilla beige didn’t initially attract me.  However, I quickly changed my mind as I noticed the objects intriguing texture.  Since color was obviously not going to be the star of this photo, I chose to focus on line, shape and form. The decision to portray this object with black and white photography gives it a timeless, elegant feel.

The Key To Finding Inspiration In Unexpected Places

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Marisa D. Aceves. Shredded Paradise. digital photography http://www.acevesart.com/

article by Marisa D. Aceves

 

The closet door is rotten.

Old wood from the roof pollutes the rain water that has been collecting in the pots, pans and storage containers we strategically placed on the porch.

We know the sleeping porch will eventually collapse.

My grandparents house is 114 years old.

Everything in it is falling apart, rusting away and crumbling into oblivion. 

The whole scene might make you cry if you dare to follow us up those leaning cement steps to the front door, yet there is hidden beauty in our pain.

We must prepare the house to be sold as is.

It is the last connection we have to a time when the world seemed less chaotic. 

 Nothing in the house appears to have any value except for its location.

It sits right in the heart of our city’s historical district.

The guidelines require that the front of the house must be preserved, but the inside can be stripped of it’s character and remodeled. 

Do we need this old house?

No.

Do we wish that we could keep it in the family?

Yes.

However, this is not possible.

Some people might say that cleaning an old house isn’t inspiring. 

There’s nothing exciting about it; especially when you know that its the beginning of closure.

Inspiration though is something you you decide to find. 

You have to choose to see what is valuable in each and every situation. 

Recently, I have decided to find inspiration in the hidden treasures that I find as I clean the dust off the antique furniture and floors.

Sometimes messes are potential masterpieces.

The key to finding inspiration in unexpected places is to keep your mind open to the possibilities that surround you. 

No one is going to drop by and tell you, “Yes, this will make a great picture. Take it.” 

Instead, it is a feeling that you get. 

It is almost instinctual.  

There is no formula for knowing what is great subject matter; each artist has to discover that for themselves.

Breaking old patterns and reexamining old patterns can lead to new discoveries.

Look at the things that you do every day. 

Approach them from a different point of view.

For example, in the above picture entitled “Shredded Paradise”, I noticed that there was beauty in the shredded curtains that use to hang in the second bedroom. 

I was sweeping one minute, then snapping this picture the next. 

Today, I challenge you to see what is great in what everyone else considers ordinary. 

You may find that the subject matter for your next photo essay, painting, sculpture, etc. has been sitting right in front of you. 

It has been unappreciated, undiscovered; it is all yours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Across the street -Suburban Landscape 2: A red car passing Sunday afternoon

Abstract photo of a Suburban Landspcape

I believe that the seeded glass often used in the windows of older homes provides an excellent backdrop for the passage of time. It obscures the details of the subject giving the scene a sense of mystery, while still providing the the rough patches of color and the general forms that make up the landscape. As you can gather from the title, this seeded glass picture, was taken at a different time than the previous one that I had posted. The texture of the seeded glass remains the same, but the color scheme is warmer, and the shapes that are visible through the glass have changed. It has been my experience, that the quite moments in life are silent treasures waiting to be discovered and appreciated. For more information on this photography series you may check out my main website at : http//www.acevesart.com/ .