Surprising Aerial Landscapes Created Using Shipping Supplies

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Marisa D. Aceves. Industrial Gum Canal. digital photography. 2017.

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

One summer afternoon, we decided to put unwanted items in storage. We took a trip to Lowes Hardware Store, picked up some heavy duty moving boxes and headed for our local Target for packing supplies. When we got home, we started to assign a number of books, clothes etc. to their designated stations. As we sealed each box with tape, I noticed the elongated bubbles that formed beige rivers on the surface. Imagining this was an aerial view of a mysterious landscape, I carefully composed my shot. Initially, I had two different versions of this photograph. However, I was more pleased with the strength of the lines and texture of the back and white one.

What does this object remind you of?

Ordinary Objects That Look Like Aerial Landscapes

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Marisa D. Aceves. Industrial Gum Canal. digital photography. 2017.

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

One summer afternoon, we decided to put unwanted items in storage. We took a trip to Lowes Hardware Store, picked up some heavy duty moving boxes and headed for our local Target for packing supplies. When we got home, we started to assign a number of books, clothes etc. to their designated stations. As we sealed each box with tape, I noticed the elongated bubbles that formed beige rivers on the surface. Imagining this was an aerial view of a mysterious landscape, I carefully composed my shot. Initially, I had two different versions of this photograph. However, I was more pleased with the strength of the lines and texture of the back and white one.

What does this object remind you of?

Ordinary Objects That Look Like Abstract Landscapes

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Marisa D. Aceves. Surfacescape 1: Graduation. digital photography. 2016

To view more of my work please visit acevesart.com

A dark road met a ray of light

They held hands for a moment

against the glowing horizon

Shadows sought to guide the way

Where fear once lived

a greater curiosity stood

Meeting pale times

too young to live in memory

 

 

Ordinary Objects That Look Like The Human Form

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Marisa D. Aceves. Long Neck Girl. digital photography. 2016.

To view more of my work and upcoming series, please visit acevesart.com.

Will To Live…

Challenges fall as we overcome

Fears that bind us

Till courage sees the sun

 

When I created this particular piece, I did not expect that it would have the overall look and feel that it did.  I was not purposefully trying to shoot this object with the human form in mind. However, that is what the results revealed.  As I stared at the finished photograph, it looked like both a human torso and a long neck and shoulders.

What does this object remind you of?

Have a wonderful weekend and a productive week!

Don’t forget to live life creatively!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Black and White Abstract Photography Series- TREASURE -COMING SOON!!!…

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Marisa D. Aceves. Treasure: Light Body. Digital Photography.

To check out the rest of my work, please visit acevesart.com

Thin strips of vine intersect. Together they create a voluptuous, open body of ripples.  Emerging from early morning shadows, this graceful form stands firm and strong.

When I first noticed this object, the light from the kitchen widows hit its surface in such a way that it almost looked like a surreal woven landscape. Upon later inspection, the form of the object reminded me of the subtle curves of the human body. In the upcoming series Treasure, I deliberately seek out objects that most people would discard.  They are aged, worn and sometimes in need of repair, but if you look at them from a different point of view, you will see their hidden beauty.

What Is Your Artistic Legacy?

Grandmother's House 1st Bedroom

 

Marisa D. Aceves. Grandmother’s House: 1st Bedroom. digital photography

Years from now…legacy

article by Marisa D. Aceves

For the last three months our minds, hearts, and lives have been tied up in preparing Eloisa’s house for sale.

Although things have slowed down considerably, I have still managed to find solace in faithfully recording some small treasures and a few rooms that remind me of my grandmother’s love.

We will make the long trip to her house again this coming week, but the journey will be a bittersweet one.

Potential buyers will traipse through the long corridor with its’ gold linoleum floors, gradually making their way through the living room, bedroom, kitchen and bath.

Eloisa was not her house; it was only a place she occupied for a certain period of time.

She has been gone for fourteen years, yet our memories of her remain.

It is not as though she sat up one day and announced that she was going to have a wonderful life and endear herself to many of the people that she came into contact with, but that is exactly what she did and all within the small, intimate confines of a typical Texas neighborhood.

The world may find the existence of an ordinary housewife boring even inconsequential.

“There’s not much of a story to tell”, they’d say under their breath preferring to read and write about flamboyant, drunken playwrights or headstrong, oversexed politicians.

There is a story to tell.

While the majority of the world may lack the imagination to see the overlooked beauty and profoundness of everyday occurrences, my grandmother knew that it is a series of small moments that make up our lives not just a couple of huge, game changing events.

If we can maintain a constant attitude of gratefulness for each and every second we are blessed to experience, we will never lose the child-like sense of wonder that leads to happiness.

She grew up sheltered from the persistent pessimism of her day.

Simple swatches of left-over wrapping paper were saved fastidiously, but not out of fear that she would not have enough of the everyday necessities we often take for granted.

“Someone else will need them!,” she would say as she carefully cut the small pieces of tape that sealed her latest birthday present, gently folding the paper into a neat rectangle for a neighbors future use.

Whenever someone was hungry, she always had beans, buttery tortillas and pinched star cookies ready to take home.

My grandmother lived her life for others; the majority of the things she did or said revolved around what was best for them.

She never judged you because you had problems; she would always pray for you and give you a big hug when you were ready to leave.

Eloisa’s legacy was a life of unconditional love and acceptance; it was a life steeped in spiritual simplicity.

Our legacy might be a different one than my grandmother’s, but all of us have an intense longing to be loved and remembered.

We want to know that somehow in this crazy, unpredictable world we made a difference.

What is your artistic legacy?

Is your work a way of life?

Does it illustrate your dreams, fears, and hopes?

What does it reveal about the way you view yourself and others?

Will you make a name for yourself and die lonely, or will you end this life with gratitude surrounded by friends and family?

Can you really have it all or do you believe you must sacrifice everything for your art?

These are questions only you can answer?

Perhaps your legacy will be based on a mantra you invent when you’re sixteen years old or maybe like Eloisa you will simply live an artful life that speaks for itself.

Why Your Differences Are The Hidden Blessings That Can Help Your Art Stand Out

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Marisa D. Aceves. Distant Memory. digital photography http://acevesart.com/

article by Marisa D. Aceves

In a sea of artists producing similar work and selling it successfully, it is easy for artists that create work outside the accepted status quo to feel both bewildered and distressed about their future.

Many of us know there are few certainties in life and yet we crave stability; We often seek it out even if it means that we give up pursuing our latest innovations.

The fear of failure is alive today as it has been for centuries.

It’s not going away.

We have to battle it one piece of artwork at a time.

Despite the overwhelming feelings some of us face as we force ourselves to push forward into unchartered artistic territory, the very things that make us different are the important elements (if used correctly) that can help us stand out.

Here are some helpful tips for overcoming the perceived mental blocks that keep us from confidence in our creativity:

1) Research Your Niche 

Carefully study what other people in your niche are creating.  How are they marketing their work? Who is their target audience?  What works for them? What doesn’t? Add your own personal voice and style to differentiate yourself from artists producing similar work. We all would like to do our own thing. We should produce the artwork that holds the most interest for us, but sometimes when the general population have difficulty with accepting the type of work we are producing, we may also have to look at what does appeal to people and why? When you complete this exercise, you are able to get outside of yourself. You begin to get valuable insights into how others view things.

2) Create Your Brand Around Your Unique Vision

Branding is a necessity, because it helps others to both know and trust you.  If an audience doesn’t know you, than trust will be difficult if not impossible.  As you market your work across different social media platforms, make sure that you are consistent with your overall message. Generally people are more likely to respond to new and different art when you reach them through your message. If your message resonates with them, then your art business has a much better chance of survival. The art then is a symbol for that message. Each time people see your work, they will think about that message because you have given them something to relate to.

3) Network With Other Artists 

Make friends and business connections with other artists.  Some may have similar interests; others may not.  When you have similar interests with other artists you may share what works and what does not. If you are in contact with artists that may not have similar interests, sometimes they can help you to view your niche from a unique perspective. Connections are key to building a successful art business.  When you reach out to others for support and encouragement, don’t forget to provide it.

4) Become A Storyteller

People want to know the story behind your art.  Share both obstacles and inspiration, but be careful not to divulge inappropriate or personal information that could hurt you and your business. When writing about your story, consider these questions:

a) What are you trying to say with your work?

b) What is important to you and why?

c) How does your world view effect the type of work you produce?

5) Share Your Success Stories

When people like and trust you, they are more likely to buy from you and promote your work.  There is nothing wrong with letting people know about a sale that you have made, a contest you have won, your latest commission or a show that features your work as long as you do this appropriately and politely. Simply informing your audience about peoples’ appreciation of your products and services is acceptable. Constantly boasting about your abilities or how much money you make can eventually irritate your audience and keep them from visiting your website so practice discretion.

While researching or creating your niche is a challenge, remember this: No thing worth doing is ever easy. The healthiest approach to tackling difficult aspects of your art business is to view them as both learning opportunities and teaching moments. If you apply the same mixture of discovery and discipline to your marketing efforts, finding your niche will be more enjoyable and less intimidating.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact me.  I’d love to hear from you.