abstract photography of a hibiscus flower

Dramatic Kaleidoscopic Abstract Art Created Using Exotic Flowers

Marisa D. Aceves. Ruby Prism Hibiscus Square. Digital Photography. 2019.

 

Your fractured petals

They burst with a new color-

My sad spring deferred

 

Our world has changed.

Will it ever be the same again?

Probably not.

The threat of the coronavirus looms large in our minds and hearts. We can try hard to escape it, retreating further into our virtual world of social media madness, or we can take some time to reflect. Whatever we choose to do in these uncertain times will reveal our core nature. What is it that we need as a culture, as a society? How can we learn to love our neighbor when the fear of loss steals our security by the minute. Where’s our spring? Can it live in our hearts even if our lives have been destroyed by fate? I’d like to think we can. We must challenge ourselves and others to maintain a positive attitude despite the chaos, defusing the hate instead of adding to it.

abstract photograph of pens

Afraid To Write About Your Art? Use These Easy Tips.

abstract photograph of pens

Marisa D. Aceves. Penscape 1. Digital Photography. 2016.

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart.com.

Article by Marisa D. Aceves

Every artist knows.
Creativity equals happiness.
When you get a new idea, you race to your studio with sparkling eyes and child-like enthusiasm.
Then, you read dozens of art marketing articles telling you to write an artist statement for your website.
People, galleries, and your art-loving aunt need to know why you do what you do.
There’s only one problem.
You’re not sure how to write about your art.
You start to begin, but the inevitable happens.
The joy fades.
Irritation begins.
Your story seems far away.
Why is writing about what you love to do so intimidating?
If the thought of captivating your future collectors makes you succumb to writers’ block and toss your laptop out the window in disgust, you’re not alone.
Let me share with you a simple truth that many artists and creative business owners fail to realize:
You don’t have to be Ernest Hemingway to write about your art.
Learning to craft a compelling story isn’t child’s play.
It takes practice, dedication, and a healthy dose of humility.
You could spend hours learning the long way.
Many people do.
You’re not many people.
That’s why you’re here.
Follow these simple tips, and you’re on your way to success.

Give A Little History

Photo by Jason Wong on Unsplash

Galleries, collectors, and the general public are anxious to know how, when, and why you became an artist.

Some artists take the traditional college/art school route, while others discover their love of art after many years of success in another occupation.
Include this information in the course of writing about your work. If you’re an artist who has a background in other fields of expertise, and you apply this experience to your art, explain how this adds to your unique approach and perspective.

 Write About Your Work Often

Photo by The Climate Reality Project on Unsplash

Practice removes your fear of writing.

While this advice seems scary at first, if you’re still learning, you’re always new at something. Set aside time in the day or week to write down your thoughts and feelings about your work. Create a schedule that you know is easy to keep.

Write-In Small Increments

Photo by Alex Block on Unsplash

Short writing bursts keep you on track.

Sitting yourself down to write for an hour or two can lead to procrastination as you wait there, tapping a pencil to paper, hoping the words will flow. If you know that you freeze when forced with a long, drawn-out job, you may want to spread it out and do other things in between writing. Taking frequent breaks or time alone to reflect eases your anxiety and helps you to collect your thoughts.

Learn From The Writing Of Others

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Research strong artist statements, essays, and grants that have intrigued galleries and collectors in the past.

The best way to learn how to write about your art is to familiarize yourself with the way fellow professional artists write about their work.

When you’re studying articles artists write about other artists, consider these questions:

a) Do they include background information about the artist before describing what they do?

b) Are they providing information about the artists’ level of education, awards, and experience?

c) Is there an attempt to describe what is unique about the artists’ work?

Once you understand how to extract small pieces of information from art articles, you’ll approach yours with less intimidation.

Here are some things to keep in mind when you examine other professionals’ artist statements:

a) What are the main themes or subjects of their work?

b) What is their particular medium?
(ex. Are they a painter, sculptor, photographer, …?)

c) Why do they create their work?

d) Who is their audience?
(ex. Is it for a rural community, animal lovers,…?)

As you read their statements, make sure to answer the questions mentioned above. When you finish, you’ll have a rough map of the information that you’ll need to include in your statement.

 

Edit Your Work

Photo by hannah grace on Unsplash

Before you publish or submit your writing sample, make sure you correct errors in spelling, punctuation, and delivery. This is especially important when applying for grants and scholarships. You may not get a second chance. Have a writing editor proofread your work for any inconsistencies in style and delivery. Make sure to get additional advice from mentors and other professionals in the industry, so you know what they’re looking for.

 

You can learn to write about your art, or pass on the responsibility to others who may or may not truly understand your vision. Sure, it’s kind of scary at first, but as you face your fears around the art of communication, your steady progress will open up opportunities you could never have imagined.

Be pro-active.
Your art deserves it.

 

Subscribe to acevesart.com to receive news about my art, upcoming shows, and helpful artist resources.

 

The-Only-Thing-You-Need-To-Know-On-Valentine's-Day

The Only Thing You Should Remember On Valentine’s Day

The-Only-Thing-You-Need-To-Know-On-Valentine's-Day

Marisa D. Aceves. Grateful Heart: Twinkling Heart Stars. digital photography. 2016.

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

Why should I wait for love when I can find it.
Yet it appears I find it in the smile on
your face and a child’s joyful laughter
complete, resplendent, never far away,
calling to me during times of war and peace.

 

I feel that I must share this series at a time when many would question whether there was any good in this world.

The frequency with which we view violence and hate in our everyday lives leads us to believe that love is a myth. However, there are people out there that do know what love is all about. Perhaps you’ve met some along the way. They appreciate you, support your efforts, and are encouraged by your success.

Sweethearts are wonderful. We all wish we had one.
However, in their absence, we can remain appreciative. Take the time this weekend to remind the special, giving people in your life how much you care.

Let’s kill those Valentines’ blues.

Have a blessed weekend and a joyful week!
Remember always, to live life creatively!

 

abstract photograph of cleaning supplies

Boring Cleaning Supplies Transform Into Eye-Popping Optical Illusion Abstract Art

abstract photograph of cleaning supplies

Marisa. D. Aceves. Coral Dandelion Whirl. Digital Photography. 2019.

Sometimes laborious chores offer the perfect photo opportunities.

I have an allergy to cleaning.
At every turn, I find a creative way to avoid it.
However, when I do get around to it, I try to find joy and mystery in my domestic misery.
Mopping the floor doesn’t have to boring!
When the water buckets stack in your favor, you know you have something special.

Enjoy the results of my latest abstract photography adventure?
Stay tuned for next week’s latest addition!

 

 

Surprising Aerial Landscapes Created Using Shipping Supplies

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Marisa D. Aceves. Industrial Gum Canal. digital photography. 2017.

To view more of my work, please visit acevesart.com .

One summer afternoon, we decided to put unwanted items in storage. We took a trip to Lowes Hardware Store, picked up some heavy duty moving boxes and headed for our local Target for packing supplies. When we got home, we started to assign a number of books, clothes etc. to their designated stations. As we sealed each box with tape, I noticed the elongated bubbles that formed beige rivers on the surface. Imagining this was an aerial view of a mysterious landscape, I carefully composed my shot. Initially, I had two different versions of this photograph. However, I was more pleased with the strength of the lines and texture of the back and white one.

What does this object remind you of?

abstract photograph of roller stamp texture

Striking, Minimalist Abstract Artwork Created Using Roller Stamps

abstract photograph of roller stamp textureMarisa D. Aceves. Double Square Maze (Orange and Violet). Digital Photography. 2019.

To view or purchase my work, please visit acevesart.com  .

Words..

Floating Across My Mind…

Some Common..

Others Sublime..

During The Day,…

They Count Numbers…

At Night,…

They Keep Time…

Sewn together in a winter’s haze…

Visit sane madness,…

A trip through my maze

I’m excited about introducing a vivid color version of my “Roller Wordy” series on my website!

Sure, black and white is beautiful, but color is so expressive.

“Roller Wordy” was created using texture from roller stamps with the intention to simulate mid-century, minimalist modern art.

Line, shape, texture and form all come into play to provide design lovers and interior decorators with simple versatility and a bold, pop of juicy color!

Check out the series here!

New additions being added soon!

 

 

 

abstract photography of home decor

Amazing Abstract Animal Artwork Created Using Popular Home Decor

abstract photography of home decor

Marisa D. Aceves. “I’ll get you, sucker”. Digital Photography. 2017.

Into the deep…

While the children sleep…

Nodding off

In their land of dreams…

Illusions crumble it seems….

With the rigors of life….

And the unwelcome confessions of troubled men..

Send them away again…

To work the urban fields and toil…

No more love…

Many tears…

They fear…

The reality that jack built..

Is more than their spirits can bear…