abstract photo of a piece of tin foil

Marisa D. Aceves, “Object 180”, Digital Photography 

 

Many of us dream of creating that elusive,..

near perfect masterpiece..

..that will instantly burn it’s bright light into the minds of  dozens of fortunate visitors that happen to stumble upon our professional websites.

We like to imagine that they would rabidly share  the next generations’ “Leonardo”,”Van Gogh”, or “Picasso”…

..and perhaps they would, …

..if they only recognized it…

Virtually none of us dream of  creating a ridiculous, amateurish monstrosity that slaps us in the face like an immature cheese and mocks us through its’ very existence.

Like a desperate bird that never made it out of a dangerous mine, it’s starved of oxygen;…

It lacks those life giving properties that all great art possesses….

We see this evil, unfortunate child of ours.

Instantly, we want to pitch it in the fire as if it had never been born…

..and yet, it is ours..

We own it because we created it.

Creating is a form of love.

We create to live.

We create for the sheer joy of creating.

So why do so many of us unfairly judge almost all of our efforts?

Some might say “quality control” and in some strange way, they might be right or as Mick Jagger likes to sing,…they might be crazy.  However, if you never allow yourself to freely create that dreaded “cheese” painting,photo,sculpture,etc., you’ll never find your “radiant child”.  It’s been my experience that “bad art” happens when we consciously try to create masterpieces, unconsciously editing out all the imperfect, clumsy, soul bearing goodness that makes us sit up and say “Wow, that is so true.”  When we deprive ourselves and others of that moment, we run the risk of  both losing ourselves and suppressing our humanity. Our humanity makes us real; it makes us accessible to others. Don’t be a victim of perfectionism. Perfectionism stinks. It’s a vicious, unrelenting thief that steals your joy first, then it steals the Art out of your art. Nothing brilliant, can come from this.  Instead, allow a small space in your day to create art with the heart and trust of a child that never knew that so called “bad art” could ever or would ever exist. Be brave enough to love your “bad art”. It won’t kill you.  It will free you from the imposed mental slavery of self-doubt. It will free you from reliance on the approval of others. Today’s “bad art” may be the key to tomorrows’ masterpiece.

*If you have any comments or questions about this article, feel free to contact me.  I’d love to hear from you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s