NEW Abstracted Nature Florals: Old Rose- Abstract photographs of familiar flowers

Abstract Nature- Old Rose

Marisa D. Aceves. Abstracted Nature Florals: Old Rose. digital photography acevesart.com

Deep crimson petals slowly unfurl from the center of the small, delicate, drying flower.  Though the initial freshness of youth has gradually left this miracle valentine rose, she still retains the underlying structure that continues to draw us in and take our breath away. All it took was the proper lighting and close attention to detail that only a macro shot could provide.

My aunt Irma’s birthday was a day before Valentine’s Day and my uncle Jesse wanted to take her to a Valentine’s dinner at the military base. We attended the dinner along with my cousins Tanya and Michael, Michael’s wife Krystina, Irma’s sister Yolanda and her husband Cipriano. Before we left their home for the base, each of the women were given a single rose to pin to their blouses. When the event was over, my mother carefully removed her rose and gently placed it in a small medicine bottle filled with water. Occasionally, she would empty and refill the bottle to keep the tender rose from rotting. It lasted a week and a few days after my aunt’s birthday. By the time I had taken this picture, my mother’s rose had significantly dried, yet the majority of it’s petals remained intact.  You might say that with her extra care, it aged gracefully. I’d like to think that this photograph  represents the aging process of many of the great women we have all been fortunate enough to know throughout the years. While they may physically change as they mature, they still retain the inner beauty that makes them unforgettable.

Fire Opal: Nebula 2 Cosmic Explosion: NEW Abstract Photography Has an Outer Space Inspiration

FIRE OPAL-NEBULA 2

Marisa D. Aceves. Fire Opal: Nebula 2 – Cosmic Explosion. digital photography

In the distant cosmos of our memories, colors burst, forming thinning starry veils. Space breathes forth it’s overwhelming majesty. Smoke and dust dance about rhythmically. The universe is alive. . . .

Very few of us realize the rich gems that surround us on a daily basis. Was this picture taken from a Nasa satellite? No. It was taken right in my home. Can you guess what this object might be? It is rather ordinary; we use it on a regular basis. Inspiring photos are not always taken on some glamorous or exotic location. All it takes is a little creativity and a willingness to look at the everyday objects from a different point of view. When we learn to see life from a different perspective, even the things we once regarded as common/ordinary hold a certain sense of fascination.

Aqua-Marine 5: Abstract Photography Inspired by Bodies of Water and Land

Aquamarine 5

 

Marisa D. Aceves. Aqua-Marine 5. digital photography http://www. acevesart.com/

If you long to live somewhere near the ocean, or you just want to take a visual and mental vacation from the present cold snap then feel free to join me once again in some meditative abstraction. . .

Blue is a beautiful and calming color that evokes meditation, mindfulness and inner serenity. When I found this series of objects, I just couldn’t resist making references to the countless number of maps that I had seen over the years. While my eyes surf through the supporting colors, my heart says, “Let’s do this again sometime.” So in the spirit of relaxation and tranquility, I am wishing you all an awesomely restful Sunday.

New Abstract Photos That look like Space and Planet Earth COMING SOON: Fire Opal: Nebula

FIRE OPAL-NEBULA

Marisa D. Aceves. Fire Opal: Nebula. digital photography

Somewhere out there in the midst of all your junk, Christmas gifts, Star Wars mini figurines, Comic Con paraphernalia, ugly sweaters from holiday parties past and rusting exercise equipment you’ll never use (even if it is the beginning of a new year) there’s a picture just waiting to be taken…….

I must admit, this has been a rough week folks, but not an uncreative one. I was able to steadily work towards finishing my abstract painting series as well as shoot the new/second addition of a series I put out last year.  In the second addition of  the Washing Stone Photo Series, I explore how ordinary objects around us can look like sections of the cosmos and parts of the planet Earth viewed from above. If you have a love of the weird and wonderful than please join me on yet another little abstract picture trip.

Until then. . . .  Have an awesome dance your pants off weekend and a productive new week.

New Abstracted Nature Series In The Works!

Abstract Picture of Pine Cone CP

Megastrobilus Seedscape: Mature Female. digital photo. Be sure to check out the rest of my photos at acevesart.com

Many times I swore I’d stay away from nature, but then the nature bug bit me and well…it was just too wonderfully beautiful and odd to resist

I’ve been feeling stressed and under the weather lately, so unfortunately there was no post Sunday.  Here I am again though, on a tough and tedious Monday trying like the dickens to share a small fruit of my labor.  I hope this photo finds a special place in your heart as we are all experiencing the best and worst of winter.

How To Determine Which Color Filter Is Best For Your Photographic Subject

Bubble Landscape (Red)

Bubble Landscape (Red). digital photography. acevesart.com

If you have never experimented with the color filters on your camera or photo editor, now is the time to try this useful exercise.

You have already chosen a specific photographic subject, but you have to determine what your are trying to say with that subject.

Whether it’s line, shape, or color that you are trying to emphasize, one has to maintain dominance.

In this demonstration, we will be covering color filters and how they affect the look and feel of the photograph.

Example #1: Bubble Landscape (Red)

Here is a an example of a photo which I have previously featured on this blog:

Bubble Landscape (Red)

Bubble Landscape (Red)

Bubble Landscape (Red). originally featured a bright swatch of red that led the eye into the picture, but the color was a little dull. After adding a small concentration of additional red using the color saturation filter, the subject of the photo comes to life as the plastic bubble texture appears to be floating over a brilliant red plane. The unusual texture coupled with the intense hue  create a decidedly modern statement.  As you can see, color is the dominant factor in this photograph, but let us examine how the look and feel of this same picture can change when we remove the red color that originally drew us in.

Bubble Landscape (RED) B&W version

Bubble Landscape (RED) B&W version

In this next example of the same picture, all of the color has been removed from the picture to create a high contrast, black and white monochrome version. When the color disappears, our focus is centered on the lines, forms and values present. Now the photo has an interesting, conceptual, almost industrial feel. Form is dominant, line follows. Notice how the repetitive forms of the bubbles create rhythm.

Bubble Landscape (RED) Sepia

In the third example we will move on to the sepia filter to see how it effects the picture. The sepia filter gives the photograph an antique feel that seems in conflict with the modern lines and forms. Instead of looking like a piece of metal or glass, the sepia lends itself to a more scientific interpretation. The photographic slide feels more like a cropped petri dish or a sample of the eggs or scales of a 19th century specimen. Again, form is dominant.

Bubble Landscape (RED) Blue TInt

For this last sample I used a concentrated cyan blue. Form is still strong, but once again, color becomes the main focus of the photograph.  The cool, cyan blue reminds us of the ocean.  The small plastic bubbles suddenly  have a new meaning as they gradually begin to take on the appearance of a school of jellyfish swimming in unison.

Example #2: Ornamental Op Landscape (Rose) 

If you have been following this blog, you will immediately recognize this picture:

Orna-mental Op Landscape- Rose

Line, Shape and Form work together, but color steals the show. The metallic green half sphere in the middle of the design seems to bust forth as brilliant oranges, greens and  magentas radiate from it’s center. It’s the color that draws you into the picture. The photograph has a floral theme even though the subject of the photo is not a flower. Color saturation was used to slightly intensify the color.

Orna-mental Op Landscape- Rose B&W

When we strip the photograph of it’s color, we begin to notice the difference that it makes on the way the same subject is interpreted. Now, the object looks like a large metallic eye, staring intensely at the viewer. While it still has somewhat of a floral look and feel, an uneasy surrealist/sci-fi effect is immediately attached to the object. High-contrast monochrome (black and white) has been used for decades, but your subject will help you to determine whether you feel that monochrome is appropriate for your photography theme.

Orna-mental Op Landscape- Rose Sepia

A sepia filter is then added to the monochrome and the photograph looks as though it were taken in the later part of the 19th century. The unusual subject looks like the eye of an unknown cryptid (unclassified creature), perhaps a once thought extinct species of fish. As we have discussed before in the previous example above, sepia added to a photograph immediately appears to give it an antique feel that sends us mentally and visually back to the era of the birth of photography.

Orna-mental Op Landscape-Blue

Finally, we end with a cyanotype blue filter which makes us think of the regular, geometric shapes  of water crystals or snow flakes. The icy, rich cyan blue also mimics the effect of looking into a  well. The repetitive lines, and shapes pull us into its’ unknown depths.

In conclusion….

I chose the vivid color version of both of these photos, because I wanted to draw the viewer in with color first as many people have an immediate, emotional attachment and reaction to certain colors. Most people are not as attached or attracted to common everyday objects as they are to people, pets and favorite locations. The challenge of every abstract (non-representational) artist, particularly photographers,  is to develop people’s interest in things that they would ordinarily dismiss.  So drawing people in with dramatic color helps to create interest were there is none.

The other choices that we have covered are certainly viable options for both abstract and representational photographic subjects. It all depends on what you are trying to convey to the viewer. Is there an underlying theme to your work? This information is important to consider as you compose and edit each picture as well as entire essays.

“No Ma’am I Didn’t See You Playing With Your Paint Brushes”

Colors In Flight Series

Colors In Flight Composition 2: What The Future Holds

Sometimes frustration and a healthy dose of restless boredom leads to the kind of experimentation we always told ourselves we wanted to do on a good day, but couldn’t be bothered.

The weekend I created these small paintings on paper, I was so tired I just didn’t know what to do with myself.

I noticed a small piece of paper I had smeared paint on as I was cleaning my brush and I reached over to pick it up, but it had paint on it.

I accidentally painted my thumb!

Trying hard not to curse out of frustration, I lazily grabbed some heavy weight paper created specifically for mixed media work and smeared my acrylic covered thumb on it.

The small thumb jab dried quickly before  I committed to taping off the edges of the paper in anticipation of a finished piece.

I used direct and indirect applications of paint to produce ten small paintings on paper that evening and following afternoon.

This sudden explosion of creativity helped me to plan the series of large, narrow paintings I am currently finishing utilizing the same methods.

Here are a couple of examples from the completed series.

COLORS IN FLIGHT COMPOS2

Colors In Flight Composition 3: The Age of Maturity

COLORS IN FLIGHT 3

Colors in Flight Composition 5: All Things Coming Together